Left Widgets Right Widgets
PTA Meeting
March 27th in MPR
Apr 2020
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
22
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
May 2020
01
01
04
05
05
06
06
07
07
08
10
10
14
15
15
22
25
27
29
29
Jun 2020
03
04
Oct 2020
18
Dec 2020
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Jan 2021
01
02
03
05
18
Mar 2021
19
20
Apr 2021
23
29
30
Leap Day
Feb 29, 2020 all day
Leap Day: February 29

Nearly every four years, we add an extra day to the calendar in the form of February 29, also known as Leap Day. Put simply, these additional 24 hours are built into the calendar to ensure that it stays in line with the Earth’s movement around the Sun. While the modern calendar contains 365 days, the actual time it takes for Earth to orbit its star is slightly longer—roughly 365.2421 days. The difference might seem negligible, but over decades and centuries that missing quarter of a day per year can add up. To ensure consistency with the true astronomical year, it is necessary to periodically add in an extra day to make up the lost time and get the calendar back in synch with the heavens.

The Egyptians were among the first to calculate the need for a leap year, but the practice didn’t arrive in Europe until the reign of the Roman dictator Julius Caesar. Before then, the Roman calendar had operated on a muddled lunar model that regularly required adding an extra month to maintain celestial consistency. Finally, in 46 B.C., Caesar and the astronomer Sosigenes revamped the Roman calendar to include 12 months and 365 days. This “Julian Calendar” also accounted for the slightly longer solar year by adding a leap day every four years.

Caesar’s model helped realign the Roman calendar, but it had one small problem. Since the solar year is only .242 days longer than the calendar year and not an even .25, adding a leap year every four years actually leaves an annual surplus of roughly 11 minutes. This minute discrepancy meant that the Julian Calendar drifted off course by one day every 128 years, and by the 14th century it had strayed 10 days off the solar year. To fix the glitch, Pope Gregory XIII instituted a revised “Gregorian Calendar” in 1582. In this model, leap years occur ever four years except for years evenly divisible by 100 and not by 400. For example, the year 1900 was not a leap year because it was divisible by 100, but not 400. The Pope’s updated calendar remains in use to this day, but it’s still not perfect—experts note that the remaining discrepancies will need to be addressed in around 10,000 years.

Upcoming Events

  1. [Mar 02, 2020] Read Across America
  2. [Mar 03, 2020] Parent Conferences - Early Dismissal
  3. [Mar 03, 2020] Super Tuesday Election Day
  4. [Mar 03, 2020] RUN @ ONE
  5. [Mar 04, 2020] Garden Meeting ~ All Are Welcome!!
  6. [Mar 06, 2020] Treasure Chest 03/06
  7. [Mar 08, 2020] Daylight Savings
  8. [Mar 11, 2020] CAC Meeting 03/11
  9. [Mar 16, 2020] Spring Break
  10. [Mar 17, 2020] ~ St. Patrick's Day ~
Our Sponsors
Our School
Attendance Line:
(949) 234-5930
Yearbook
Photo Submission
Send us your Photos
PTA Membership
Join Today!
Together we can do so much!

Powered by VLink Website Builder

For information on what VLink can do for your school organization contact: sales@myvlink.org